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Flight delays today LIVE: Ryanair & Easyjet cancel more flights today as airport travel chaos continues

EASYJET have cancelled more flights today, creating more chaos at airports as travel disruption continues to anger Brits across the UK.

Ten thousand passengers who had booked to fly on EasyJet today, from and within the UK have had their flights cancelled.

According to The Independent, at least 60 flights have been grounded today, most of them to and from London Gatwick.

Britain’s biggest budget airline is unable to crew the schedule it has planned from the Sussex airport, and is cancelling around 30 flights daily at a few days’ notice.

Yesterday, dozens of flights between the UK and Italy were cancelled – with easyJet, Ryanair and British Airways among the airlines affected.

Another airline cancelling flights was TUI – with several flights cancelled. The airline plans to cancel around 200 flights throughout June.

Meanwhile, airline lobbyist Willie Walsh has criticised transport secretary Grant Shapps for having blamed the aviation industry for hundreds of cancelled flights.

The director-general of the International Air Transport Association said Mr Shapps has been “absolutely useless in his approach to the coronavirus crisis”.

At a conference in Paris on Tuesday he also said: “Since the beginning of the pandemic, as minister of transport, he’s done nothing for the industry.”

Read our TUI cancellations live blog below for the latest updates…

  • European labour strife & staff shortages disrupt summer travel

    Growing labour strife in Europe is driving expectations of further travel headaches during the busy summer season, with airports and airlines clamouring to find more workers, minimize cancelled flights and reduce delays for passengers.

    Yesterday, we reported that some 1,000 SAS pilots in Denmark, Norway and Sweden said they could go on strike from late June, even as workers at France’s Charles de Gaulle airport walked off the job, with a quarter of flights cancelled.

    Airport managers in Europe and Canada are struggling to quickly recruit and process new hires, even as the rebound in air travel from the pandemic-induced slump leads to cancelled flights and hours-long lines.

    On Wednesday evening, German flag carrier Lufthansa and its subsidiary Eurowings said they were scrapping over 1,000 flights in July, or 5% of their planned weekend capacity.

  • Explained: Why wouldn’t I get my money back?

    The airline doesn’t have to give you a refund if the flight was cancelled due to reasons beyond their control, such as extreme weather.

    They’ll usually say this is because it is down to an “extraordinary circumstance” but it can be a tetchy subject, and one plenty of customers prefer to contest.

    You can try challenging this if you think you should have got your some money back, or at least flown in the first place.

    For example, other airlines may have set off at the same time yours was kept back.

    Take any complaints to aviation regulator the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).

    You’re also not going to get any money back if you were forewarned of the cancellation.

    If you’re told at least two weeks in advance you should have time to swap your booking without paying a penalty, at least that’s the airline’s thinking as they won’t dish out automatic refunds.

    You also won’t be able to claim compensation for flights cancelled but rerouted that get you to your destination no more than two hours later than planned.

    You can’t of course get your money back if you do opt for the alternative flight.

  • Further train strikes to take place

    Unions have announced more train strikes to take place on 23-29 June and 13-14 July.

    Train drivers are to strike over pay, and more rail workers are to be balloted for industrial action. This could cause huge travel disruption in the coming weeks.

    Aslef announced strikes at three companies in separate rows over pay, while the Transport Salaried Staffs Association (TSSA) served notice of an industrial action ballot.

    Members of Aslef on Hull Trains will strike on June 26, at Greater Anglia on June 23 and on Croydon Tramlink on June 28 and 29 and July 13 and 14.

    Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union are set to strike on Network Rail and 13 train companies later this month.

    Train operator Avanti West Coast is also in a dispute over pay, conditions and job security.

    TSSA general secretary Manuel Cortes said: “Avanti West Coast needs to come to the table to face the concerns of their staff and tell their paymasters in government that widespread rail disruption is on the cards.

    “Avanti West Coast staff are asking for some basic fair treatment – not to be sacked from their jobs; a fair pay rise in the face of a cost-of-living-crisis; and no race to the bottom on terms and conditions.

    “We could be seeing a summer of discontent across our railways. We are preparing for all options, including co-ordinated strike action.”

  • Pilots told to stop complaining

    A boss of a giant budget airline has complained that flight crew that too many of them are reporting fatigue – leading a pilots’ union to react furiously.

    József Váradi, chief executive of Wizz Air, said in an internal video message: “Now that everyone is getting back into work, I understand that fatigue is a potential outcome of the issues.

    “But once we are starting stabilising the rosters we also need to take down the fatigue rate.

    “I mean we cannot run this business when every fifth person of a base reports sickness because the person is fatigued.

    “We are all fatigued. But sometimes it is required to go the extra mile.”

  • SAS airline pilots warn of potential strike from late June

    Some 1,000 SAS pilots in Denmark, Norway and Sweden could go on strike from late June over disagreement on wages and ways to cut costs at the struggling Nordic airline, labour unions said yesterday.

    “We have been negotiating for months without being able to agree,” Danish Pilot Union leader Henrik Thyregod said in a statement.

    “We have gone to great lengths to help SAS, and we have offered the company huge savings. But we can under no circumstances agree to deteriorations (or wage cuts) of more than 30%, which SAS demands,” he said.

    If an agreement is not possible, Danish pilots could go on strike from June 24 but would likely wait until June 29 when Swedish pilots can strike at the earliest according to local regulation, Danish chief negotiator Keld Baekkelund told Reuters.

  • Which?: Last-minute flight cancellations are unacceptable

    Which? has called the daily flight cancellations for thousands of passengers “totally unacceptable”.

    Rory Boland, editor of Which? Travel, said: “Thousands of EasyJet passengers have had their travel plans thrown into chaos by flight cancellations. Some holidaymakers have been notified on the day they were due to travel, which is totally unacceptable.

    “We continue to hear concerning examples of the airline failing to fulfil its legal obligations to passengers and ignoring their rights. If a flight is cancelled within 14 days of departure, passengers could be entitled to compensation and should be offered the option of being rerouted using another carrier if necessary. We know this requirement is not always being met, so the government and Civil Aviation Authority must intervene where airlines are playing fast and loose with the rules.

    “The cavalier approach some airlines are currently taking towards their customers is a reminder of why passenger rights must be strengthened. The government should drop plans to slash compensation for delayed and cancelled domestic flights and give the CAA direct fining powers so it can properly hold airlines to account when they flout the law.”

  • South Africa’s BA operator files for liquidation

    Comair, the South African operator of British Airways flights, filed for liquidation today.

    This comes after its bankruptcy administrators failed to raise enough money to keep it in the air.

    The administrators have “lodged a court application to convert the business rescue proceedings into liquidation proceedings”, the company said in a statement.

    “Regrettably, the requisite funding could not be raised in order for the company to continue with its operations,” the administrators said in a separate statement.

    “Accordingly, the company’s joint business rescue practitioners give notice herewith that they no longer believe that there is a reasonable prospect that the company can be rescued.”

  • Lufthansa axes hundreds of flights over staff shortages

    German national carrier Lufthansa today said it was cancelling hundreds of flights during the summer holidays because of staff shortages as the industry attempts to bounce back from the pandemic.

    The company said in a statement it had seen a “jump in demand” as the coronavirus outbreak has eased, which “after the most severe crisis in aviation is good news”.

    However, it said that “infrastructure has not fully recovered”, leading to “bottlenecks and staff shortages” in Europe, hitting airports, ground services, air traffic control and airlines.

    As a result Lufthansa said it had scrapped 900 German and European flights for July at its hubs in Frankfurt and Munich on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays — around five percent of its normal weekend capacity.

    Its carrier Eurowings axed “several hundred flights” for July.

  • Explained: Why wouldn’t I get my money back?

    The airline doesn’t have to give you a refund if the flight was cancelled due to reasons beyond their control, such as extreme weather.

    They’ll usually say this is because it is down to an “extraordinary circumstance” but it can be a tetchy subject, and one plenty of customers prefer to contest.

    You can try challenging this if you think you should have got your some money back, or at least flown in the first place.

    For example, other airlines may have set off at the same time yours was kept back.

    Take any complaints to aviation regulator the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).

    You’re also not going to get any money back if you were forewarned of the cancellation.

    If you’re told at least two weeks in advance you should have time to swap your booking without paying a penalty, at least that’s the airline’s thinking as they won’t dish out automatic refunds.

    You also won’t be able to claim compensation for flights cancelled but rerouted that get you to your destination no more than two hours later than planned.

    You can’t of course get your money back if you do opt for the alternative flight.

  • How do I get back what I’m owed?

    You’ll have to go straight to your travel provider if you want to get back anything you’re owed.

    EasyJet customers can go to manage my booking on its website or app, where you can switch your flight for free, get a voucher to use in the next 12 months or request a full refund.

    TUI customers meanwhile, can do the same on its own refund request page.

    If you’re after a full refund you should get it back within seven days.

    To claim compensation though, usually your flight needs to have departed from a UK airport, arrived into a UK airport and was with a UK or EU airline or arrived into the EU and was with a UK airline.

    You could be able to claim for £220 per person on shorter journeys, and £520 on longer distances says one travel expert.

    If these don’t apply, you need to contact the airline to get back anything you feel you may be owed.

  • European labour strife & staff shortages disrupt summer travel

    Growing labour strife in Europe is driving expectations of further travel headaches during the busy summer season, with airports and airlines clamouring to find more workers, minimize cancelled flights and reduce delays for passengers.

    Earlier we reported that some 1,000 SAS pilots in Denmark, Norway and Sweden said they could go on strike from late June, even as workers at France’s Charles de Gaulle airport walked off the job, with a quarter of flights cancelled.

    Airport managers in Europe and Canada are struggling to quickly recruit and process new hires, even as the rebound in air travel from the pandemic-induced slump leads to cancelled flights and hours-long lines.

    On Wednesday evening, German flag carrier Lufthansa and its subsidiary Eurowings said they were scrapping over 1,000 flights in July, or 5% of their planned weekend capacity

  • ‘Stricter controls for British travellers” at Spanish airports

    “Stricter controls for British travellers due to the UK’s exit from the EU” is a major cause of current queues and delays at Spain’s airports, El Pais, a Spanish newspaper has reported.

    Lack of staff at airfields and long queues have photographed by many tourists during the past month.

    “Spain will be one of the most affected [by the UK’s exit from the EU],” the newspaper explained, “because tourists residing in the United Kingdom account for more than 20 per cent of the foreign travelers who arrive in the country each year.”

    A police union representative predicted that the present queues will only get worse as we move into summer.

    “Summer is just around the corner and there will be a notable increase in passengers who will take longer to pass the controls. Therefore, there is no doubt that there will be more congestion,” said a spokesperson for the country’s largest police union, Jupol.

  • Stag do stranded in Amsterdam embark on epic 230-mile mission home 

    A stag do stranded in Amsterdam after their flight was cancelled went on an epic 230-mile mission home – and were forced to buy BIKES from locals to catch the ferry back.

    The British lads enjoyed their time in the Dutch capital and spent two days enjoying the sights and sounds.

    They were booked onto an easyJet flight to return to London Gatwick at 1:25pm on Saturday – which was then scrapped.

    Their options to return to Britain by air or rail were limited, so the 14-strong party decided the best route was take a train to Calais and board a ferry.

    But when they called up to ask about the crossing to Dover they were told foot passengers were not allowed – although bikes were.

    Undeterred, the group spent the afternoon buying two-wheelers from locals in Brussels and Lille.

    Amazingly, 13 of the 14 large group managed to buy a bike in just three hours.

    Upon arriving in Calais, the last member of the group convinced a young couple to let him into their car for the crossing.

  • Further train strikes to take place

    Unions have announced more train strikes to take place on 23-29 June and 13-14 July.

    Train drivers are to strike over pay, and more rail workers are to be balloted for industrial action. This could cause huge travel disruption in the coming weeks.

    Aslef announced strikes at three companies in separate rows over pay, while the Transport Salaried Staffs Association (TSSA) served notice of an industrial action ballot.

    Members of Aslef on Hull Trains will strike on June 26, at Greater Anglia on June 23 and on Croydon Tramlink on June 28 and 29 and July 13 and 14.

    Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union are set to strike on Network Rail and 13 train companies later this month.

    Train operator Avanti West Coast is also in a dispute over pay, conditions and job security.

    TSSA general secretary Manuel Cortes said: “Avanti West Coast needs to come to the table to face the concerns of their staff and tell their paymasters in government that widespread rail disruption is on the cards.

    “Avanti West Coast staff are asking for some basic fair treatment – not to be sacked from their jobs; a fair pay rise in the face of a cost-of-living-crisis; and no race to the bottom on terms and conditions.

    “We could be seeing a summer of discontent across our railways. We are preparing for all options, including co-ordinated strike action.”

  • Which?: Last-minute flight cancellations are unacceptable

    Which? has called the daily flight cancellations for thousands of passengers “totally unacceptable”.

    Rory Boland, editor of Which? Travel, said: “Thousands of EasyJet passengers have had their travel plans thrown into chaos by flight cancellations. Some holidaymakers have been notified on the day they were due to travel, which is totally unacceptable.

    “We continue to hear concerning examples of the airline failing to fulfil its legal obligations to passengers and ignoring their rights. If a flight is cancelled within 14 days of departure, passengers could be entitled to compensation and should be offered the option of being rerouted using another carrier if necessary. We know this requirement is not always being met, so the government and Civil Aviation Authority must intervene where airlines are playing fast and loose with the rules.

    “The cavalier approach some airlines are currently taking towards their customers is a reminder of why passenger rights must be strengthened. The government should drop plans to slash compensation for delayed and cancelled domestic flights and give the CAA direct fining powers so it can properly hold airlines to account when they flout the law.”

  • SAS airline pilots warn of potential strike from late June

    Some 1,000 SAS pilots in Denmark, Norway and Sweden could go on strike from late June over disagreement on wages and ways to cut costs at the struggling Nordic airline, labour unions said today.

    “We have been negotiating for months without being able to agree,” Danish Pilot Union leader Henrik Thyregod said in a statement.

    “We have gone to great lengths to help SAS, and we have offered the company huge savings. But we can under no circumstances agree to deteriorations (or wage cuts) of more than 30%, which SAS demands,” he said.

    If an agreement is not possible, Danish pilots could go on strike from June 24 but would likely wait until June 29 when Swedish pilots can strike at the earliest according to local regulation, Danish chief negotiator Keld Baekkelund told Reuters.

  • British Airways departures from Heathrow

    British Airways has cancelled 124 short-haul flights to and from London Heathrow airport today.

    At least 106 international flights are cancelled.

    International: 53 outbound, 106 sectors in total:

    • Amsterdam (4)
    • Athens
    • Barcelona
    • Basel
    • Berlin (2)
    • Billund
    • Bologna
    • Brussels (2)
    • Bucharest
    • Budapest
    • Copenhagen
    • Dublin (2)
    • Dusseldorf
    • Faro
    • Frankfurt
    • Funchal (Madeira)
    • Geneva (3)
    • Gibraltar
    • Gothenburg
    • Hamburg (2)
    • Ibiza
    • Larnaca
    • Lisbon
    • Madrid
    • Malaga
    • Milan Linate
    • Milan Malpensa
    • Oslo (2)
    • Paris CDG (2)
    • Pisa
    • Prague
    • Rome (2)
    • Sofia
    • Stockholm
    • Toulouse
    • Venice
    • Vienna (2)
    • Warsaw
    • Zagreb
    • Zurich
  • Pilots told to stop complaining

    A boss of a giant budget airline has complained that flight crew that too many of them are reporting fatigue – leading a pilots’ union to react furiously.

    József Váradi, chief executive of Wizz Air, said in an internal video message: “Now that everyone is getting back into work, I understand that fatigue is a potential outcome of the issues.

    “But once we are starting stabilising the rosters we also need to take down the fatigue rate.

    “I mean we cannot run this business when every fifth person of a base reports sickness because the person is fatigued.

    “We are all fatigued. But sometimes it is required to go the extra mile.”

    Credit: Alamy
    Credit: Alamy
  • South Africa’s BA operator files for liquidation

    Comair, the South African operator of British Airways flights, filed for liquidation today.

    This comes after its bankruptcy administrators failed to raise enough money to keep it in the air.

    The administrators have “lodged a court application to convert the business rescue proceedings into liquidation proceedings”, the company said in a statement.

    “Regrettably, the requisite funding could not be raised in order for the company to continue with its operations,” the administrators said in a separate statement.

    “Accordingly, the company’s joint business rescue practitioners give notice herewith that they no longer believe that there is a reasonable prospect that the company can be rescued.”

  • Lufthansa axes hundreds of flights over staff shortages

    German national carrier Lufthansa today it was cancelling hundreds of flights during the summer holidays because of staff shortages as the industry attempts to bounce back from the pandemic.

    The company said in a statement it had seen a “jump in demand” as the coronavirus outbreak has eased, which “after the most severe crisis in aviation is good news”.

    However, it said that “infrastructure has not fully recovered”, leading to “bottlenecks and staff shortages” in Europe, hitting airports, ground services, air traffic control and airlines.

    As a result Lufthansa said it had scrapped 900 German and European flights for July at its hubs in Frankfurt and Munich on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays — around five percent of its normal weekend capacity.

    Its carrier Eurowings axed “several hundred flights” for July.

  • British Airways departures from Heathrow cancelled

    Domestic: Nine flights in total

    • Aberdeen (2)
    • Belfast City
    • Edinburgh (2)
    • Glasgow (2)
    • Jersey
    • Manchester
  • British Airways cancels another 124 flights

    British Airways has cancelled 124 short-haul flights to and from London Heathrow airport today.

    According to The Independent, 19 domestic flights have been grounded, including two round-trips from Heathrow to Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow.

    At least 106 international flights are cancelled, including four round-trips from Heathrow to Amsterdam, plus holiday flights to Faro, Ibiza and Madeira.

  • Ryanair flight warning

    Ryanair passengers could see huge flight disruptions this summer as cabin crew across Europe are threatening to strike.

    SITCPLA and Spanish union USO have joined with organisations in France, Portugal, Italy and Belgium.

    Europe’s biggest budget airline walked away from the talks on Tuesday arguing the strike threat by European unions showed a lack of commitment to dialogue, USO and STCPLA said in a joint statement.

    SITCPLA said: “We’re coordinating our actions with European counterparts.” 

    A Ryanair spokesperson told Sun Online Travel: “Ryanair has negotiated collective agreements covering 90 per cent of our people across Europe.

    “In recent months we have been negotiating improvements to those agreements as we work through the Covid recovery phase. Those negotiations are going well and we do not expect widespread disruption this summer.

    In Spain, we are pleased to have reached a collective agreement with CCOO, Spain’s largest and most representative union, delivering improvements for Spanish-based cabin crew and reinforcing Ryanair’s commitment to the welfare of its cabin crew.

    “These announcements by the much smaller USO and SITCPLA unions are a distraction from their own failures to deliver agreements after three years of negotiations and we believe that any strikes they call will not be supported by our Spanish crews.”

  • EasyJet cancellations from Gatwick

    As mentioned earlier, ten thousand passengers who had booked to fly on easyJet today, from and within the UK have had their flights cancelled.

    Here is a list of flights that were cancelled from Gatwick:

    • Alicante
    • Bodrum
    • Catania
    • Faro
    • Krakow
    • Limoges
    • Lisbon
    • Malta
    • Marrakesh
    • Marseille
    • Milan Malpensa
    • Montpellier
    • Munich
    • Olbia
    • Palermo
    • Paris CDG
    • Prague
    • Santiago
    • Seville
    • Verona
    • Zurich
  • I was left fuming after TUI staff called my cancelled flight and airport chaos an ‘ENJOYABLE day out’

    A mum has told how she was left fuming after TUI staff called her cancelled flight an “enjoyable day out”.

    Sarah Butterworth had been heading to Greece for her 50th birthday after forking out £2,100 on the girls trip when they were met by airport chaos.

    She told The Mirror : “We had actually got to the airport and had just joined the queue when a woman with a clipboard came over and asked us where we were going.

    “We told her and she said ‘I’m sorry it’s been cancelled five minutes ago’.

    “We had been watching the news and it was saying they were cancelling six flights a day but that if yours was cancelled you would be told the night before.

    “We were checking our emails and phones and the flight constantly, and it kept saying it was still scheduled, they were sending us emails saying ‘get ready for your holiday’.

    “When they told us it was cancelled I was fuming, you feel like crying, I had to go outside because I was so angry.”

    Sarah claims things got worse where TUI staff began to poke fun at her misery.

    She said: “I said to one of the girls I bet you’ve been dreading coming to work today and she said ‘oh no it’s a day out, I’ve actually quite enjoyed it’.

    “I said ‘that’s really insensitive’ and that’s when I had to leave the airport. She was only young but she could have chosen her words a bit better.”

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https://www.thesun.ie/travel/8882206/flight-delays-uk-today-heathrow-tui-easyjet/ Flight delays today LIVE: Ryanair & Easyjet cancel more flights today as airport travel chaos continues

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