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From the glow of a supermoon to the glow of a dim meteor shower

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The Perseid meteor shower is one of the most popular shows for stargazers and graces the skies every year from July 14th to September 1st. The meteor is called Perseus because it appears to be in the constellation Perseus.

This year, Perseid The meteor shower will occur on August 12th and 13th. The show is perfectly timed for stargazing enthusiasts hoping to catch a glimpse of one of the most famous meteor showers visible from Earth, but this year’s meteor shower coincides with the full moon in August, and the moon’s brightness means that no meteors can be seen. Lights that make it difficult to see.

“Unfortunately, this year’s Perseus peak is going to be a disaster for observers,” said Bill Cook, a NASA astronomer and leader of the Meteorological Environment Office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. “Most of us in North America would normally see 50 to 60 meteors an hour, but this year, during a normal peak, the full moon will bring that down to no more than 10 to 20 meteors an hour.” will reduce.”

The moon is relatively dark compared to other celestial bodies and is one of the least reflective bodies in the solar system, but because it is so close to the earth, it appears bright from the earth. Just one day before the Perseid meteor shower (at 9:35 PM on August 11), the Moon is opposite the Sun, brighter than the long-awaited “shooting star.”

Sunrise over Earth - Sputnik International, 1920, August 3, 2022

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August’s supermoon, Sturgeon, is one of the last supermoons of the year and appears brighter than a “normal” full moon. Supermoons are especially large because they are so close to Earth.

Perseus is a fragment of ice and rock left behind by Comet Swift-Title, which passed Earth in 1992. Swift Title is one of the largest celestial bodies known to pass Earth repeatedly, taking 133 years to orbit the Sun. It will not return to Earth until 2125.

The moon may now overtake Perseus Augustbut the “shooting stars” don’t start to fade until August 21st and 22nd, and completely disappear by September 1st, so you might have a chance to catch a glimpse of them after the Moon begins to fade.



https://sputniknews.com/20220807/supermoons-glow-to-dim-meteor-showers-shine-1099346624.html From the glow of a supermoon to the glow of a dim meteor shower

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