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In the photo: Norwegian air ambulance service

A fleet of helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft operates from more than 20 bases across Norway and provides important medical services. This is the story of the air ambulance service.

If you need emergency medical care in Norway, call 113. Ambulances are available in most cities and towns. But what about the countryside and the hard-to-reach mountainous areas?

Norwegian ambulance helicopter. Photo: Stiftelsen Norsk Luftambulanse

Owned by 4 people Local health authoritiesThe Norwegian Ambulance Service (Luftambulansetjenesten) supports 20,000 patients each year.Given the difficult terrain of Norway, it is an important part of Norway Norwegian emergency services..

Nationwide service

The service is really national. Headquartered in Bodø, the medical technology department is in Trondheim and the flight coordination center is in Tromsø.

Norwegian ambulance helicopter flying over Skjærgård. Photo: Stiftelsen Norsk Luftambulanse
An ambulance helicopter flying over Skjærgård. Photo: Stiftelsen Norsk Luftambulanse

The actual flight by the air ambulance crew is outsourced to two operators. Babcock Scandinavian AirAmbulance AS operates fixed-wing aircraft from Gardermoen, Ålesund, Brønnøysund, Bodø, Tromsø, Alta and Kirkenes.

Norsk Luftambulanse AS operates helicopters from Arendal, Lørenskog, Ål, Dombås, Stavanger, Bergen, Førde, Ålesund, Trondheim, Brønnøysund, Harstad, Tromsø and Kirkenes. The operation base is on standby 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Easter training practice. Photo: Stiftelsen Norsk Luftambulanse
Easter training practice. Photo: Stiftelsen Norsk Luftambulanse

As an important part of Norway Emergency measures, Services are available for search and rescue helicopters, if available. They are located in Banak, Bodø, Ørland, Florø, Sola and Rygge. Ambulances also support search and rescue operations as needed.

Norwegian ambulance

This service uses a Cessna C680A latitude ambulance and eight Beechcraft King Airs. Three types of helicopters are used: Airbus H135-T3, H145-T2, and Leonardo AW139.

Beechcraft King Air aircraft on the beach B250 King Air in Osloger Demoen. Photo: John Tollefsen SBAA / Luftambulansetjenesten HF.
Beechcraft King Air aircraft on the beach B250 King Air in Osloger Demoen. Photo: John Tollefsen SBAA / Luftambulansetjenesten HF.

Norwegian hospitals are responsible for medical care and have nurses and doctors on planes and helicopters.

Ambulance Foundation

In 1979, doctor and pioneer Jensmo voluntarily launched the Norwegian Air Ambulance Service, financially supported by the Foundation now known as Stiftelsen Norsk Luftambulanse, or the Norwegian Ambulance Foundation in English.

Hans Morten Rossius, Secretary General of Stiftersen Norsk Ruftambrance. Photo: Stiftelsen Norsk Luftambulanse
Ambulance helicopter over Oslo. Photo: Stiftelsen Norsk Luftambulanse

The Norwegian Air Ambulance Foundation strives to provide faster and more accurate medical assistance to anyone who is seriously ill and seriously injured, anywhere in Norway.

Nonprofits are working to provide patients with life-saving medical care. More than 300,000 support members and companies participate in philanthropy to develop and improve air ambulance services through the Foundation.

Hans Morten Rossius, Secretary-General
Hans Morten Rossius, Secretary General of Stiftersen Norsk Ruftambrance. Photo: Stiftelsen Norsk Luftambulanse

The Norwegian Air Emergency Helicopter, a subsidiary of the Foundation, operates all 13 medical helicopter bases in the country. It also owns the Norwegian ambulance technology subsidiary. This technology owns several ambulance buildings and develops and operates the technology used in emergency medical services.

Video support solution

A good example of the Foundation’s innovation mission is that 113 operators have been able to use mobile phone cameras to get an overview of emergencies and provide advice.

An ambulance helicopter in Evenes, northern Norway. Photo: Fredrik Naumann / Felix Features
An ambulance helicopter in Evenes, northern Norway. Photo: Fredrik Naumann / Felix Features

“There are valuable minutes that can be saved by using video so that 113 operators can see themselves, so that they understand the best possible situation and optimize the right resources. It can be activated and activated to save minutes and collect time at all stages, “said Jørgen Hauge Skogmo, project manager and former 113 operators.

The solution is Developed by the foundation Thanks to the funding provided by that support member. It was then donated to the Public Health Service. So far, more than 50,000 video calls have been made.

https://www.lifeinnorway.net/norwegian-air-ambulance/ In the photo: Norwegian air ambulance service

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