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Mexico City mayor wants to become first woman president

MEXICO CITY, Sept. 23 (Reuters) – Claudia Scheinbaum, the mayor of Mexico City, a trained physicist who aspires to become the country’s first female president, said her environmental credentials and crime-fighting skills were strong. We hope the success will help set her apart in the competition for the best jobs in Mexico.2024.

Scheinbaum, a staunch ally of left-leaning president Andrés Manuel López Obrador, has a slight lead over his rivals in recent polls, gearing up for the presidential candidacy of the ruling National Renewal Movement (MORENA) party. proceeding.

A strong supporter of the president’s social welfare program, which has helped build his power base and tackle inequalities across the country, Scheinbaum, 60, has been criticized by many within his party for his Seen as an obvious ideological successor.

“I was there[with Lopez Obrador]in good times and bad,” said the minister when he was mayor from 2000 to 2005.

“The president’s project must be integrated. I share the president’s vision of a just Mexico, and one in which the welfare state must play a fundamental role in development.”

The country is set to elect its next president in June 2024, and other potential prospects, including Scheinbaum and Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard, are vying for MORENA’s candidacy, which is expected to be resolved by late 2023. starting.

Lopez Obrador, barred by law from running for a second term, has dominated national politics since taking office in 2018, making Morena much more popular than the main opposition.

If she becomes his successor, Scheinbaum, whose scientific reserve contrasts with López Obrador’s combative approach to politics, knows how symbolic this achievement will be for girls and women in Mexico and beyond. He said that he was keenly aware of how it would become something special.

“I can only express that just imagine the honor and responsibility it means,” she said, praising the example of Cacha Echazarretta, who in June became the first Mexican-born woman to go into space. did.

green energy

López Obrador’s move to bolster the state-owned oil and gas company and the state-owned power company, which rely heavily on fossil fuels, has come at the expense of private wind and solar power companies, as well as the United States and other longtime allies. causing friction with

The policy has also upset some on the Mexican left, who are eager for the country to prioritize renewable energy sources.

Scheinbaum, who was part of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize, defends López Obrador’s efforts to pursue energy independence, but says he wants to tap Mexico’s green energy reserves. thinking.

When asked how the Scheinbaum administration would differ from its predecessors, she emphasized her support for López Obrador’s vision for Mexico, but said, “It’s important to really leverage renewable energy in this country. I think so,’ he said.

Some are calling for a tax increase. Asked whether he supported tax increases, Scheinbaum declined to be drawn, saying the question required careful analysis.

Mexico City’s forking has been successful in reducing the gang-fueled violence that has ravaged the country for years.

Scheinbaum said the city has targeted problem areas, increased the number and salaries of police officers on the streets, and more than quadrupled the number of video surveillance cameras.

Nationally, homicides have barely fallen in 2021 from nearly 34,000 in 2018, but Mexico City’s total has fallen by more than a third over the same period.

Things have calmed down a bit nationally this year. Mexico City is trending down to half its 2018 total.

Still, Scheinbaum said the improvement will depend on close cooperation between city authorities and the federal military.

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https://www.vallartadaily.com/mexico-city-mayor-eyes-history-in-bid-to-be-first-female-president/ Mexico City mayor wants to become first woman president

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