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New President Yoon Seok-yul takes office, explaining North Korea

Seoul, May 10: President Yoon Seok-yul took office on Tuesday and faced a tougher combination of foreign policy and domestic challenges than other recent South Korean leaders he encountered during his inauguration.

Won In-chul, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said in a video conference that North Korea is ready to conduct a nuclear test. Yun then said, “The security situation on the Korean Peninsula is very serious,” and ordered military commanders to maintain solid military readiness. Yun will take his inauguration and give his inauguration speech at a formal ceremony in Seoul on Tuesday morning. Results of the South Korean Presidential Election 2022: US President Joe Biden congratulates President Yoon Suk-yul and reaffirms his commitment to address the threat of North Korea..

Yun, who has advocated a stronger approach to North Korea since the general election in March, has been denied a honeymoon period. According to the survey, less than 60% of respondents expect to be successful in the presidency, which is unusually low compared to their predecessors, who mainly received about 80% to 90% before taking office. According to a Gallup Korea survey released last week that rated President Moon Jae-in’s predecessor at 45%, his approval rate as president-elect was 41%.

Yun’s unpopularity is partly due to the sharp gap between conservatives and liberals, as well as controversial policies and cabinet choices. Some experts say that Yun, a foreign policy novice, is also the world’s 10th largest economy in terms of advances in North Korea’s nuclear weapons, intensifying competition between the United States and China, and a pandemic livelihood. He states that he does not have a clear vision of how to navigate the great powers.

“Our foreign policy, national security and economy are all in trouble. Yun has some visions and hopes to show how he can attract the public during these difficult times. Or should have presented leadership, but I don’t think he showed such a thing. “

North Korea’s Prime Minister Kim Jong-un has recently threatened to use nuclear weapons against his rivals and is reportedly preparing to conduct a nuclear test for the first time in nearly five years, as US-led negotiations on nuclear disarmament have stalled.

The US-China conflict raises another security dilemma as South Korea struggles to balance its major military ally, Washington, with its largest trading partner, Beijing.

During the campaign, Yun accused the moon of being too far from North Korea and China, and Washington, while using its relationship with South Korea’s former colonial ruler Japan for domestic political purposes. bottom.

He vowed to abandon the Moon’s appeasement policy towards North Korea, strengthen South Korea’s alliance with the United States, and improve relations with Japan. Critics say Yun’s policy will create friction between North Korea and China, but he is likely to strengthen trilateral security cooperation between South Korea and the United States.

Professor Chung said South Korea must accept that it cannot force North Korea to denuclearize or alleviate the US-China conflict. He said South Korea should instead focus on strengthening its defense capabilities and the US alliance in order to “never think of North Korea’s nuclear attack on us.” .. He also said South Korea must prevent its relations with Beijing from deteriorating.

Domestically, some of Yun’s major policies could face a deadlock in Congress, which remains under control by Liberal Party members until the 2024 general election. Critics say the bill is intended to prevent Yun from investigating possible misconduct by the Moon administration.

Yun also has to rebuild South Korea’s pandemic response, which has been shaken by the massive Omicron surge in recent months. The COVID-19 crisis has hit an economy that is already hit by a tough job market and growing personal debt. Yun also inherits the failure of the month’s economic policy, which critics say has soared house prices and widened one of the worst wealth gaps between developed countries.

Hee-seop Choi said, “The challenges that President Yun faced when he took office are the most difficult and the most disadvantageous.” , Director of the Seoul-based Presidential Leadership Institute.

Yun, 61, has been criticized by even some conservative supporters for relocating his office from the Blue House presidential residence on the hillside. Yun said moving to the center of the capital aims to improve communication with the public, but critics say there are many other urgent issues he should address. I wonder why he prioritized it.

Some of Yun’s cabinet picks have been involved in ethical revocation and allegations of misconduct. His health minister was accused of using his position as head of a university hospital to help his children enroll in medical school. Nominee denies that claim. Yun, a beginner in domestic and foreign policy, resigned last year following a civil war with the party and was the chief prosecutor of the moon before joining a conservative opposition.

Hee-seop Choi said Yun had not established his own solid power base within the conservative camp. This is one of the reasons he suffers from low approval rates.

Some experts say that if US President Joe Biden’s planned trip to Seoul next week agrees on steps to strengthen South Korea’s national security and economy, Yun will give public confidence in his leadership. Say it’s a good opportunity to promote.

President Yun’s early outlook could also depend on June 1’s mayoral and governor elections. Choi said that if the liberals get more posts in the local government while maintaining a majority in parliament, “the situation will be very difficult for Choi.”

(This is an edited and auto-generated story from the Syndicated News Feed. LatestLY staff may not have changed or edited the content body)



https://www.latestly.com/agency-news/world-news-new-south-korean-president-takes-office-briefed-on-north-korea-3688649.html New President Yoon Seok-yul takes office, explaining North Korea

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