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The story of Mira Gojasalich and the Republic of Dalmatia in Polzica

Statue of Mira Gojasalich on Omiš (Photo courtesy of Ivan T. /CC BY-SA 3.0).

By Iva Ralica

The Republic of Polzica was once within the Croatian border. Settled on the River Cetina, these villages still have the same-named Pordica and keep many secrets left to discover when entering this part of Croatia.

The story of the Republic of Polzica is related to the dark Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Settled in central Dalmatia near Omiš, the autonomous state was organized as a “Peasant Republic” and its own legislation was enacted in 1440. Today, this is one of Croatia’s most important historical laws. In the Middle Ages, when torture was a method of arbitrary punishment, Polzica’s decree included that “everyone has the right to live.”

The area is surrounded by the gorgeous River Cetina and River Zrunofnica, Mount Mosor and its hinterland. It also included Eqetium, an ancient Greek colony, and the region from Omiš to Stobreč. The name itself, poljica, comes from the Croatian field (polje), and the word republic was added in the 18th century by the Venetian writer Alberto Fortis.

The parish commune of Polzica was founded by three brothers, Tihomir, Cresimir and the Venetian writer Alberto Fortis.

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The parish commune of Polzica was founded by three brothers, Tihomir, Cresimir and Elem, the sons of Croatian king Miloslav. The area was divided into 12 villages (manga), each of which was a free farmer’s village, with the elder as the leader. He was called knez or the Little Duke. They were dominated by the highest numbers. Together with three judges, they were all noble births, but were elected by the citizens.

Some aristocrats came from different parts of Croatia and Hungary, and they were called vlastela. The original aristocrat, Diditch, was a descendant of King Miloslav, mentioned above, and had rights to the land, also known as Didvina, a term still used on the Croatian coast today, where the land is inherited by the family.

Polzica’s Highlander was an ally of Omiš’s pirates. Both accepted Venetian sovereignty, but their own internal freedoms were intangible.

Nevertheless, from 1530 to the 17th century (1686), the Ottoman Empire influenced the Republic of Polzica. In both battles, the Ottoman army was rejected.

The first battle is also known in Croatia by its heroine, the young woman Mira Gojasalich. She was a distant descendant of Croatian king Goislav, but Mira is considered a folk heroine. Ahmed Pasha of the Ottoman Empire had an army of 10,000 in 1530 and headed to take over Polzica.

His camp was in a village called Podgrac in Gata. Legend has it that he saw the beautiful girl Mira while walking around and decided to take her. Some sources said she was raped, others said she volunteered to be sacrificed to Ahmed Pasha to lose her virginity to come to a Turkish camp. I am.

The story of Mira Gojasalich and the Republic of Dalmatia in Polzica

Today’s Omiš

On March 27, she set foot in the camp at dawn and set fire to the camp with piled ammunition. In this way she killed herself, Ahmed Pasha, and many soldiers, but also surprised other soldiers attacked by the Polzica people.

Today, the statue of Mira Gojasalich, carved by Ivan Mestrović, sits above the town of Omiš near the River Cetina, protecting it and its beautiful environment from the dangers of its enemies. Besides the sculptors, many prominent Croatian artists have incorporated Mira and this legend into their works. August Shenoa wrote about her, and Jakov Gotwak composed an opera in 1951 bearing her name.

Mira’s birthplace is Costanger, which is revealed every year in honor of her. This story may sound very familiar to Croats, but the reality is different. The story is set somewhere between fiction and reality, but other (and certainly) fictional heroines are much more well known.

A similar story can be found in Judita, written by the famous Croatian writer Marco Marlicch in 1501. This can also be the basis of the legend about Mira. Other analogies are the Robinja (slave girl) written by Hannibal Lucic when the talk about the army of Mira and the Ottoman Empire took place, the famous story Moreshka, and the dance from the Croatian island Korcula. You can also see it.

Moreshka

Still, the uncertainty that Mira is a real or fictional character makes this story about the forgotten Croatian Ark Joan even more interesting.

https://www.croatiaweek.com/the-story-of-mila-gojsalic-the-republic-of-poljica-in-dalmatia/ The story of Mira Gojasalich and the Republic of Dalmatia in Polzica

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