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There is no change in the safety differences in Helsinki between regions

Results of Helsinki Safety Survey It shows that there are differences between residential areas in terms of how safe residents consider them to be. Differences in safety perceptions between neighboring areas are important, but the differences have not changed from previous studies. City residents are most concerned about the loss of green space, graffiti and vandalism, and social exclusion.

One of the key questions in the Helsinki Safety Survey is how respondents feel safe when walking alone in a residential area late Friday or Saturday night. The situation is very stable in most areas, and only a few areas have significantly increased or decreased their sense of security.

The majority, or 3 in 4 of all respondents, feel safe in their area at midnight. In some areas, one in three people in the neighborhood feel unsafe on weekends, but in the areas where they feel safest, only 3% of respondents reported the same. In the major eastern districts, I felt that the safety and security situation was worse than average.

Experiences of anxiety are concentrated in areas where socio-economic indicators do not work.

Seeing violence and drugs can lead to danger. There is a clear link between the violence observed in one’s neighborhood and the anxiety perceived over the weekend in that area. Seeing violence leads to anxiety rather than signs of substance abuse. The correlation between seeing violence and seeing substance abuse is very high, meaning that both are found in the same area.

City residents are worried about the loss of green space, graffiti and vandalism, and social exclusion.

The three main issues that Helsinki residents were most concerned about were the loss of green space, graffiti and vandalism, and social exclusion. About 40% of respondents were at least quite concerned about these issues. Housing for special groups, provision of alcohol to drunk people, and drinking by public parties are minimal.

The oldest people over the age of 65 are most concerned about residential issues. For example, only one in four respondents under the age of 25 was quite worried about graffiti and vandalism.

However, over the last six years, there has been growing concern about signs of social disability. Perceived social disability and perceived anxiety also have a strong link.

Helsinki Safety Review Determines Residents’ Peace of Mind and Reassurance

The Helsinki Safety Survey confirms the safety and security of residents in the neighborhood and in the city center every three years. The data and subsequent analysis focus on the daily lives of residents in their respective residential areas. These regions are not expected to be significantly affected by what is happening elsewhere in the world. Safety surveys have been conducted in much the same way since about 20 years ago.

The latest data were collected in late 2021 before Russia invaded Ukraine, and the results do not indicate the possible impact of the war on the reassurance of respondents. The target group consisted of Helsinkians aged 15-79 years. The questionnaire was sent to 7,818 people, of whom 3,980 responded. The investigation was conducted by the City of Helsinki and the Helsinki Police Station.

The published analysis is part of a series of surveys, and relevant research articles will be published in Kvartti Magazine. The article (Keskinen & Kainulainen-d’Ambrosio 2022) previously published the findings and discusses the general developments of the city’s perceived safety situation.

Source: Helsinki City

https://www.helsinkitimes.fi/finland/finland-news/domestic/21781-no-change-to-differences-in-perceived-safety-of-helsinkians-between-areas.html There is no change in the safety differences in Helsinki between regions

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