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Vienna faces Nazi history at an art exhibition

The exhibition of works of art in Vienna during the Nazi era exposes the politics of art under the German Empire to help the Austrian capital harmonize with the heritage of World War II.

Art exhibition “Auf Linie, Or “Politics of Art under Vienna Falls in Line-National Socialism,” is the result of four years of research on 3,000 artists under the Nazi government.

Curators Ingrid Holzschuh and Sabine Plakolm-Forsthuber have made this effort to reconcile Austria, which claims to be a victim of Nazi Germany, with its dark past.

Following the annexation of the Austrian Nazis in 1938, known as “Anschluss,” more than 65,000 people were killed from the Austrian Jewish population, making the country an accomplice to the Holocaust.

“Since the late 80’s, there has been a big change in mood … a big process of remorse,” said historian Gerhard Baumgartner, head of the Austrian Resistance Documentation Center.

For the curators of the exhibition, examining art from Austria under Nazi Germany is part of that reflection process. (AFP)

“We need to understand history. There are still many gaps and we need to fill these gaps,” says curator Holtzschew.

The exhibition will showcase paintings, sculptures, pottery and even textiles to provide insights into the cultural aspects of Reich and detail the background of the pro-Nazi artist behind the artwork. ..

“This can’t be like any other exhibition in the classical sense … it had to be split,” Holzschuh added.

The exhibition of Nazi-era works is limited to two rooms at the Wien Museum, unlike the other works on the large walls of the Wien Museum.

The exhibition of Nazi-era works is limited to two rooms at the Wien Museum, unlike the other works on the large walls of the Wien Museum. (AFP)

In the wake of the annexation of Austria, the Nazi government intervened in the country’s cultural affairs following a forced identification (Naziization) process.

The administration forcibly disbanded the Austrian arts organization and gathered all its artistic efforts under the Reich Chamber of Culture, a branch of the Reich Chamber of Culture.

Admission to the Chamber of Commerce was an obligation for artists to resume their work professionally.

According to the museum, the curator used the membership files of about 3,000 artists to prepare the exhibition. This exhibition “provides insights into the political power structure, processes, networks and artistic attitudes of the Nazi government, actors, and their works of art.” ..

This exhibition introduces the municipality of Vienna under the German Empire as

This exhibition introduces the municipality of Vienna under the German Empire as “an important patron of Nazi art”. (AFP)

According to a curator’s investigation, the Nazi administration carefully watched over the artists and verified whether they were in compliance with the administration.

According to the exhibition catalog, “The Nazi government has secured control of the art world and steered it according to its idealistic and racist vision.”

Regarding the internal workings of the Reich Chamber of Culture, “Aspiring members had to meet the artistic, political and racial standards of the Nazi administration.”

Political opponents and Jewish artists were forbidden to become members, along with artists of the government who were considered “too avant-garde,” and as a result practiced their art.

Artists accused of not following the regime found themselves in a concentration camp where they were either forced to flee or were killed.

Artists accused of not following the regime found themselves in a concentration camp where they were either forced to flee or were killed. (AFP)

Another goal of the curator was to reveal that artists such as the sculptor Wilhelm Frass, who claimed loyalty to the German Empire, remained influential after World War II.

Not only did Fras himself continue to work after the war, he was asked to work by the city of Vienna.

Curator research for the exhibition has built a 300-page catalog.

Curator research for the exhibition has built a 300-page catalog. (AFP)

The exhibition “Auf Linie” will begin on October 14, 2021 and will continue until April 14, 2022. According to the spokeswoman Konstanze Schaefer of the Wien Museum, it has already attracted “extreme interest”.

However, displaying Nazi artwork is costly. The museum has been criticized by the Austrian daily newspaper, Kurier, For spending a lot of money on Nazi art.

However, city council member Veronica Kaup Hassler said, “Coping with the culture of memory and one’s history plays an important role in the city’s cultural policy,” a museum that reveals and reconciles the past. I agree with the goals of.

Curators Sabine Plakolm-Forsthuber (L) and Ingrid Holzschuh (R). Behind it is a painting of a Viennese opera adorned with a Nazi flag and a tapestry with a swastika.

Curators Sabine Plakolm-Forsthuber (L) and Ingrid Holzschuh (R). Behind it is a painting of a Viennese opera adorned with a Nazi flag and a tapestry with a swastika. (AFP)

Source: TRT World and distributors

https://www.trtworld.com/magazine/in-pictures-vienna-faces-its-nazi-history-in-art-exhibit-53157?utm_source=other&utm_medium=rss Vienna faces Nazi history at an art exhibition

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