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WHO turns to public asking monkeypox name not to be ‘stigmatized’

According to the United Nations Health Organization, monkeypox got its name before current best practices in naming diseases.

Monkeypox virus was first identified in monkeys kept for research in Denmark in 1958, but the disease has been found in many animals. (Reuters)

The World Health Organization, which is trying to rename monkeypox, has asked the public for help in coming up with a destigmatizing designation for the rapidly spreading disease.

Before Tuesday’s announcement, the United Nations health agency had been expressing concern for weeks about the name of the disease, which appeared on the world stage in May.

Experts warn that while it is named after a primate, it has played little part in its spread and could stigmatize the African continent with which the animal is often associated. .

For example, there have been recent reports of monkeys attacking monkeys for fear of disease in Brazil.

WHO spokeswoman Fadela Scheib told reporters in Geneva that “human monkeypox was named before current disease nomenclature best practice”.

“We want to find a name that doesn’t stigmatize,” she added, noting that consultations are now available through a dedicated website.

Monkeypox is so named because the virus was first identified in monkeys kept for research in Denmark in 1958, but the disease has been found in many animals, most frequently in rodents. Found in teeth.

read more:
Monkeypox cases surge, US declares public health emergency

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZQBmgxLGzY

international public health emergency

The disease was first identified in humans in 1970 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and since then its spread in humans has been largely confined to certain West and Central African countries where it is endemic.

But in May, cases of the disease, which causes fever, muscle aches and large skin lesions like boils, began to spread rapidly around the world.

More than 31,000 cases have been confirmed worldwide since the beginning of the year, with 12 deaths, according to the WHO.

The virus can be transmitted from animals to humans, but WHO experts argue that the recent global outbreak is due to close human-to-human contact.

The United Nations Health Organization announced last week that a group of experts it convened had already agreed on new names for monkeypox virus variants or clades.

Historically, the two main varieties have been named after the geographical regions of the Congo Basin and West Africa.

Experts agreed to rename them using Roman numerals instead, calling them Clade I and Clade II. A subspecies of Clade II, now known as Clade IIb, is considered the main culprit behind the ongoing global outbreak.

read more:
India announces first death from monkeypox in Asia

Source: AFP

https://www.trtworld.com/life/who-turns-to-public-in-search-for-less-stigmatising-monkeypox-name-59814?utm_source=other&utm_medium=rss WHO turns to public asking monkeypox name not to be ‘stigmatized’

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